Speech therapy focuses on improving communication skills and on improving the use of oral muscles involved in speech and swallowing. This includes sound and word pronunciation, grammar skills, language skills, fluency and stuttering, apraxia, tongue thrust, language disorders associated with autism, hearing rehabilitation, swallowing disorders, and any other speech or language disorder.

Speech and language evaluations are conducted by a licensed and certified Speech-Language Pathologist. Therapy is conducted by a Speech-Language Pathologist or a licensed Speech Therapy Assistant who works under the direct supervision of a Speech-Language Pathologist.

The following is a developmental checklist. It is a guideline of the average age when children acquire certain skills. Each child develops at his or her own pace, but if you have concerns about a child’s development, please call us. We can schedule an evaluation with a licensed professional in the area of concern, and we can determine whether the child is delayed or developing on schedule.

By 6 months your child should be able to:

  • Make high-pitched squealing sounds
  • Make grunting or growling sounds when playing
  • Respond to voices by turning head
  • Make sounds like “da,” “ga,” “ka,” “ba”
  • Smile at self in the mirror

By 12 months your child should be able to:

  • Say 3 words, like “mama,” “dada,” and “baba” (for bottle)
  • Follow one simple direction, like “Come here,” “Give it to me,” or “Put it back.
  • Point to something when he wants something

By 18 months your child should be able to:

  • Say 18-50 different words
  • Go into another room to find a toy when asked, like “Go get your blanket.”
  • Repeat a 2 word sentence

By 2 years your child should be able to:

  • Name familiar things
  • Combine 2 words on his own
  • Have a vocabulary of 150-300 words
  • Use at least 2 of the following: I, me, you, my, mine
  • Understand differences in meaning (stop vs. go, and big vs. little)
  • Follow 2 step directions (Get the toy and give it to me)

By 3 years your child should be able to:

  • Point to at least 7 different body parts on himself
  • Make a sentence that has 3-4 words in it
  • Tell you what is happening in a picture (running, eating, crying, jumping)
  • Can tell you her first and last name

By 4 years your child should be able to:

  • Tell at least two things you do with an object, such as a ball (throw it and kick it)
  • Use endings on words, like “-s” to talk about more than one item and “-ed” to talk about something that happened in the past
  • Follow three step directions without help
  • Speak in complete sentences

By 5 years your child should be able to:

  • Use words that compare, like “heavier,” “stronger,” or “smaller”
  • Can answer “What do you do when you are hungry?” and “What do you do when you are tired?”
  • Be able to have a conversation that makes sense with an adult
  • Use good grammar in sentences

Each child develops at his or her own pace, but if you have concerns about a child’s development, please call us. We can schedule an evaluation with a licensed professional in the area of concern, and we can determine whether the child is delayed or developing on schedule.

This information in compiled from the following source: Ages and Stages Questionnares- 3, Brooks Publishing Co.