Physical therapy focuses on gross motor abilities. This includes crawling, walking, sitting, climbing, running, kicking, jumping, riding a tricycle, skipping, and balance. Physical therapy also includes exercises for strengthening weak muscles and for increasing the range of motion of muscles.

Physical therapy evaluations are conducted by a licensed Physical Therapist. Therapy is conducted by a Physical Therapist or a licensed Physical Therapy Assistant under the supervision of a Physical Therapist.

The following is a developmental checklist. It is a guideline of the average age when children acquire certain skills. Each child develops at his or her own pace, but if you have concerns about a child’s development, please call us. We can schedule an evaluation with a licensed professional in the area of concern, and we can determine whether the child is delayed or developing on schedule.

By 6 months your child should be able to:

  • Get into a crawling position
  • Bear some weight on legs when you hold both hands for balance
  • Sit up
  • Roll over one way

By 12 months your child should be able to:

  • Walk holding onto furniture with only one hand
  • Stand without holding onto anything
  • Bend down, pick up a toy, then stand back up while holding onto furniture

By 18 months your child should be able to:

  • Walk well without falling
  • Climb onto furniture to reach something
  • Bend over, pick up a toy, then stand up without holding onto anything
  • Kick a ball

By 2 years your child should be able to:

  • Walk down stairs while holding onto the railing or someone’s hand
  • Run well without falling or bumping into something when she stops
  • Jump with both feet leaving the floor at the same time

By 3 years your child should be able to:

  • Ride a tricycle
  • Stand on one foot for 2 seconds
  • Walk up stairs with one foot on each step
  • Jump forward at least 6 inches with both feet leaving the floor at the same time

By 4 years your child should be able to:

  • Catch a large ball with both hands
  • Climb a ladder on the playground and slide down without help
  • Throw a ball overhand to a person at least 6 feet away
  • Hop up and down on one foot without falling

By 5 years your child should be able to:

  • Stand on one foot for at least 5 seconds without holding onto anything
  • Walk on tiptoes for 15 feet (about the length of a car)
  • Can skip
  • Swing without help to get started
  • Ride a bicycle with training wheels

Each child develops at his or her own pace, but if you have concerns about a child’s development, please call us. We can schedule an evaluation with a licensed professional in the area of concern, and we can determine whether the child is delayed or developing on schedule.

This information is compiled from the following source: Ages and Stages Questionnares- 3, Brooks Publishing Co.